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Crusader III

Crusader III


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Crusader III

A Crusader III armed with a 6pdr gun on the road to Bou Arada, the limit of a German tank sortie of 10 January 1943

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12 thoughts on &ldquo Knights Templar: Escapees in Scotland &rdquo

As someone of Scottish & English descent

my family having immigrated about 1525 to America

I appreciate this additional history lesson. Thanks!

jerseygirltoday
Your family immigrated to America 82 years before the Jamestown Settlement started?

I discovered a Roman Scottish Chalice with Historical inscription of The Knight Templars of 1289. In the 1800’s Charles Fox discovered a Chalice like this one, but someone removed the historical reference from it. I know have the one that not only states that it is a Scottish Templars Chalice, but also reference the Chalice to have existed in the year 1289 due to the handles that describe a young princess. I can send any one, if interested, the information.

Very interesting… That’s pre Rosslyn Chapel time, and pre leaving the Holy Land.

I found this desolated wine cup on a hot afternoon day in Sep of 2015 at the Mission Flea Market located at the corner of Loop 410 and Moursund Blvd in San Antonio Tx. I had no idea who manufactured the cup or where it came from. I found it interesting and challenging so I bought it for one dollar.

It wasn’t long before I found out that the Corbell Company had reproduced, in 1950, a Scottish chalice very similar to the one I found. The history of this chalice originated in England around the mid 1800’s by a man name Charles Fox who was the silversmith to the Queen. It was said that the original chalice had missing handles. This made me think that I had boughten something very special because this chalice still had the handles. After further investigation I realized that the chalice also had two templars flags which was something not found on the one Charles Fox discovered. These two new items of interest compelled me to study the history and to tell the story. I decided to label the cup a Roman Scottish Templar’s Chalice due to the fact that it carries Roman history and history of Scotland’s knight Templars.

STORY OF THE
ROMAN SCOTTISH TEMPLAR’S
CHALICE

The wine cup was originally made to tell an ancient Roman story. The cup is of Roman design based on the art and the fact that you can feel the art with your fingers, as if it was carved out. The top of the cup is surrounded by a prosperous vine which intertwines two coats of arms from the old kingdoms describing two Kings that came together under the Roman Empire whom fought for a Christian cause as depicted by the Roman Christian shield. The white cloth around the shield symbolizes a nobel cause which was awarded to the two kings for their under taking. Their historic achievements is detailed at the top of the shield explaining their campaign which extended all the way to the Far East where they out smarted and captured the elephant in war. For their courageous victory they were awarded the name of The Fox. The emblem siting on top of the shield describes a fox who captured an elephant and is taking him back to Rome on a boat as proof of their victory. Since they were fighting under The Roman Empire, the shield should have had the wreath with the SPQR initials which proclaims the senate and people of Rome as being victorious in their campaign.

( to be continued on second part of story )

Well, at the moment we don’t know how old the cup is, but someone along the line decided to scrape of the information on the shield so they could inscribe new history pertaining to the Fox. The inscription describes two castles as working together whom considered themselves being descendants of the Fox. These two castles shared the same coat of arms. The top portion of the shield shows the primary castle. To its left is a fox and above the fox are three Christian stars. The stars are representations of the organization’s past contributions to the first, second, and third crusades. These stars are fallowed by a Templar’s flag indicating the organization they belong to. The lower left portion of the shield shows the secondary castle. On the right side of the castle is a different but similar kind of fox and above it are the three stars plus the Templar’s flag indicating that both of them were of the Templar’s military order. In fact this chalice brings the history of the old and the new fox together. History recognizes theses two castles to have existed in Scotland. In the 13 century two castle were recognized as chartered castles they were not considered part of Scotland’s military. The primary castle was Dumfries and the secondary castle was Carlaverock. They were both six miles apart. Their primary mission was to protect the catholic Christians and their monasteries from robbers in the southern part of Scotland. Their secondary mission was to protect the south trading port and trading routes because they were involved in trading themselves.Therefore initially they were not involved in Scotland’s war for independence until England decided to sieged their castles. The war destroyed the primary castle and the secondary castle was partially destroyed.

Thank You, I hope you read the third part of the story

An unknown crafty silversmith managed to remove the original inscription on the shield in order to add other historical information. He did by laying the chalice on its side with the shield facing up. He then installed a metal holder inside the cup and proceeded to stamp the information by utilizing some kind of hammer. He slightly dented the bottom side of the cup because it was not properly secured plus he also incurred several small metal nicks inside the cup leaving evidence of original workmanship.

The silversmith also added two handles which carry the face of a young noble child wearing head armor.

In the year 1289, same time as the two castles, Scotland announces their new hire to the throne which happens to be the six year old Norwegian princess, granddaughter of king Alexander, name Margaret. She was five years old when her grandfather died. The reason why she did not get announced earlier was because her step grandmother announced that she was pregnant at the time. Her stepmother had a miscarriage which left Margaret the sole hire to the throne. The face of a young Nobel child sits on both handles and has a striking resemblance to the young princess. The queen, scheduled to take the thrown the fallowing year, mysteriously dies of sea sickness when she arrived in Scotland.

This event sparks the beginning of Scotland war for independence. During the war, in 1307, the pope excommunicates the Templars and by 1314 they disband the order. Historical information found can only authenticate a story but it cannot truly date an artifact. The artifact has to be authenticated by an experience professional who authenticates artifacts. I hope that there someone who can help in verifying how old the cup in order to attach an auction price value so we can auction it off.

Thank You, I hope you share the story

If you could see a photo of the chalice you would know what I’m talking about.

Well, I decided to describe in more detail the handles found on the chalice, for those who are interested in the reasons of why I believe that the child on the handles is the Norwegian Princess Queen of Scotland of 1289 and not 1290. One of the most noticeable features is that she looks like she could be age 5 or six. That is why I said 1289 and not 1290. It is not everyday that a child gets her face put on top of a Chalice that carries Roman, Scottish, and knight Templars history. Especially wearing head armor and a fancy looking scarf. She has the same round face as her historic glass painting. Her hair has a split down the middle of her forehead. Her lips are small and very much the same to include that they are not much wider than the width of her nose. Her right eye is not the same as her left eye. I suspect that she might of had a small accident on her right eye. With all these indicators one has to agreed with the fact that is her face on the handles. You usually only need three indicators to attract suspicion, but here you have the armor, the hair, the lips, the eye, the round face, plus the fact that she is located on top of the chalice as an important designated person of that era. The chalice or chalice maker is describing the story of the young queen when the Pope and England approved of her being the elected queen to Scotland which was more than a year before her Coordination. This is the story that the chalice is describing. I would like to add one more piece of information concerning the handles that proves that there was for sure two cups made with these handles. Due to the fact that I navigated the old Goodwill Store in San Antonio for many years, I remember seeing another handle laying at the bottom of a bin in the early 1990’s. I remember thinking that it was some kind of ornament that had fallen off of something. I remember throwing the queen back to the bottom of the bin. If I would have known Scottish history I would have kept it. But why? Who made it? And when? Are three questions we do not know, but there was another one that was found by the silversmith Charles Fox which had no handles or Templar flags in the Mid 1800’s which could shed some light as to where they came from. Apparently he made reproductions of them which you can find in Scotland or England.

You can find a photo of the wine cup, goblet, or chalice depends what you want to call it? I call it a chalice because of its history. You can find it under Scottish Roman Charles Fox Chalice. An important person from England put it on his Pinterest.


In Game

This is the Tier III British Tank. It has a good top speed compared to other tier III tanks though it is tied for the least amount of armor. It has the second highest firepower only behind M3A3 Lee so it has the best firepower with a turret giving it a good advantage in its tier. Against lower tier tanks it is powerful like all tier III's and can quickly destroy them with its heavier firepower and it is almost as fast when fully upgraded. Against tanks in its tier and above it should stick to flanking or the support role. Circling is possible with it's high mobility as well though not as effective against the faster opponents this can face like the Shermans.


The Crusades A History

This exciting new third edition includes: - Substantial new material on crusade theory, historiography and translated texts - An expanded scope that extends the text to cover the decline of crusading in the nineteenth century - Valuable .

Author: Jonathan Riley-Smith

Publisher: Bloomsbury Academic

The Crusades: A History is the definitive account of a key topic in medieval and religious history. Jonathan Riley-Smith, a world authority on the subject, explores the organisation of a crusade, the experience of crusading and the crusaders themselves, producing a textbook that is as accessible as it is comprehensive. This exciting new third edition includes: - Substantial new material on crusade theory, historiography and translated texts - An expanded scope that extends the text to cover the decline of crusading in the nineteenth century - Valuable pedagogical features, such as a revised bibliography, maps, illustrations and a brand new chronology This book is essential reading for all students and scholars seeking to understand the Crusades and their significance in world history.


Saladin

Saladin (1137/1138�) was a Muslim military and political leader who as sultan (or leader) led Islamic forces during the Crusades. Saladin’s greatest triumph over the European Crusaders came at the Battle of Hattin in 1187, which paved the way for Islamic re-conquest of Jerusalem and other Holy Land cities in the Near East. During the subsequent Third Crusade, Saladin was unable to defeat the armies led by England’s King Richard I (the Lionheart), resulting in the loss of much of this conquered territory. However, he was able to negotiate a truce with Richard I that allowed for continued Muslim control of Jerusalem.

On July 4, 1187, the Muslim forces of Saladin (Salah al-Din) decisively defeated the crusader army south of the Horns of Hattin in Palestine, capturing Guy, king of Jerusalem Reginald of Châtillon, Saladin’s enemy whom he personally killed over two hundred Knights Hospitaller and Templar Knightly Orders whom he ordered to be killed and many crusaders whom he ransomed. The remaining captured Christians were sold on the local slave markets.

Born into a Kurdish, Sunni, military family, Saladin rose rapidly within Muslim society as a subordinate to the Syrian-northern Mesopotamian military leader Nur al-Din. Participating in three campaigns into Egypt (which was governed by the Shi`ite Fatimid dynasty), Saladin became head of the military expeditionary forces in 1169. After he was appointed wazir(adviser) to the Shi`ite caliph in Cairo, he consolidated his position by eliminating the Fatimid’s sub-Saharan infantry slave forces. Finally, in 1171 the Shi`ite Fatimid caliphate was brought to an end by Saladin with the recognition of the Sunni caliphate in Baghdad. In the meantime, Nur al-Din kept pressuring Saladin to send him money, supplies, and troops, but Saladin tended to stall. An open clash between the two was avoided by the death of Nur al-Din in 1174.

Although Egypt was the primary source for his financial support, Saladin spent almost no time in the Nile Valley after 1174. According to one of his admiring contemporaries, Saladin used the wealth of Egypt for the conquest of Syria, that of Syria for the conquest of northern Mesopotamia, and that of northern Mesopotamia for the conquest of the crusader states along the Levant coast.

This oversimplification aside, the bulk of Saladin’s activities from 1174 until 1187 involved fighting other Muslims and eventually bringing Aleppo, Damascus, Mosul, and other cities under his control. He tended to appoint members of his family to many of the governorships, establishing a dynasty known as the Ayyubids in Egypt, Syria, and even Yemen. At the same time he was willing to make truces with the crusaders in order to free his forces to fight Muslims. Reginald of Châtillon violated these arrangements, to Saladin’s annoyance.

Modern historians debate Saladin’s motivation, but for those contemporaries close to him, there were no questions: Saladin had embarked on a holy war to eliminate Latin political and military control in the Middle East, particularly Christian control over Jerusalem. After the Battle of Hattin, Saladin, following the predominant military theory of the time, moved rapidly against as many of the weak Christian centers as possible, offering generous terms if they would surrender, while at the same time avoiding long sieges. This policy had the benefit of leading to the rapid conquest of almost every crusader site, including the peaceful Muslim liberation of Jerusalem in October 1187. The negative was that his policy permitted the crusaders time to regroup and refortify two cities south of Tripoli—Tyre and Ashkelon.

From Tyre, Christian forces, reinforced by the soldiers of the Third Crusade (1189�), encircled Muslims in Acre, destroyed the bulk of the Egyptian navy, and, under the leadership of Richard the Lion-Heart, captured the city and slaughtered its Muslim defenders. Saladin, by avoiding a direct battle with the new crusader forces, was able to preserve Muslim control over Jerusalem and most of Syria and Palestine.

Saladin’s reputation for generosity, religiosity, and commitment to the higher principles of a holy war have been idealized by Muslim sources and by many Westerners including Dante, who placed him in the company of Hector, Aeneas, and Caesar as a “virtuous pagan.”

The Reader’s Companion to Military History. Edited by Robert Cowley and Geoffrey Parker. Copyright © 1996 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.


The F-8 Super Crusader: The Hot Navy Fighter that Almost Replaced the F-4 Phantom

Had things gone differently, the U.S. Navy's top Cold War fighter jet could have been the F-8 Crusader instead of the F-4 Phantom.

But not the legendary Crusader that bested MiGs over North Vietnam. Instead, it would have been the XF8U-3, dubbed the Crusader III or the “Super Crusader,” a bigger, badder version of the F8U Crusader that the Navy flew in the 1950s and early 1960s.

The Crusader III was developed by manufacturer Chance Vought at the same time as it developed the Crusader I and II models used by the Navy. Despite similar names, the Crusader III was a larger aircraft that actually didn't share many parts with its siblings.

The Super Crusader made its debut flight in June 1958. “The overall performance of the Dash III was outstanding,” says aviation writer Steve Pace in his history of the Crusader. “Officially the Dash III had a recorded top speed of Mach 2.39, unofficially Mach 2.6 was predicted. Some proponents felt Mach 3 was not out of the question. The Super Crusader was capable of continued Mach 2.2 speed at 68,000 feet. It demonstrated 6-G capability and continued 51/2-G turns at Mach 2.2. At the time, the -3 was the only single-engine fighter in the world capable of near Mach 2.4 speed.”

The Super Crusader differed from the Crusader I and II in a variety of areas. It had a more powerful JT-4 turbojet engine instead of a JT-3, which helped give the Crusader III a higher speed, climb rate and maximum ceiling. It also featured all-weather capability, longer range, more advanced flight controls, better maneuverability and two retractable ventral stabilizing fins. Chance Vought even proposed mounting a rocket motor in the Super Crusader’s tail for extra boost.

Ironically, Phantoms were found deficient in Vietnam because they weren’t armed with an internal cannon to supplement the unreliable early-generation air-to-air missiles. The Crusader I and II won plaudits because they did carry cannon—but not the Crusader III. Like the F-4, the Super Crusader was proposed as a cannon-less fighter armed only with seven air-to-air missiles: four Sidewinder heat-seekers and three Sparrow radar-guided weapons. Still, all-missile armament was the fighter fad in the years leading up to the Vietnam War, so the choice was understandable, if mistaken.

In mock dogfights, the Crusader III regularly defeated early-model Phantoms. Pace cites a Navy aviation expert who said, “The F8U-3 went farther, faster, it turned better, cost less, weighed less, and it would go as far on internal fuel as the F4H-1 could go with a 600-gallon external fuel tank. . . . The airplane was, I guess, 25 percent cheaper than the F4H. As I said, the F8U-3 was the best airplane we ever canceled.”

Yet the Navy ultimately chose the F-4 Phantom as its carrier-based fighter. Why? It couldn’t have been looks: the Super Crusader was a far sleeker aircraft than the pudgy Phantom. Perhaps it was economics as the Department of Defense in the early 1960s pushed for a common fighter for the Air Force, Navy and Marines. Safety might have had something to do with it, too: the Crusader I and II were known for high accident rates.

Or was it because the Super Crusader was a hotshot dinosaur, a superb throwback to an earlier era of stick-and-rudder dogfights? For example, Sparrow missiles required painting the target with a radar beam. A Phantom pilot could leave this to his backseat weapons officer while he flew the plane: the pilot of a single-seat Super Crusader would have had to fly the plane and control the Sparrow. The Phantom was also more versatile, serving as a bomber, Wild Weasel air-defense killer and reconnaissance aircraft.

In fact, the F-4 was so remarkably adaptable and tough that the last U.S. military Phantom wasn't retired until December 2016. For all the speed and maneuverability of the Super Crusader, it is doubtful whether it could have remained relevant for fifty-eight years.

Somehow it seems appropriate that the Super Crusader prototypes ended their days pushing the frontier of flight for NASA. “Since the new Crusaders could fly above 95 percent of the earth’s atmosphere, they were naturally useful for space research,” writes Barrett Tillman in his book MiG Master: The Story of the F-8 Crusader.

“They were also engaged in sonic-boom intensity studies, but more sporting diversions were occasionally found,” Tillman writes. “The story is told that NASA pilots flying out of Langley, Virginia, gleefully bounced Phantoms undergoing evaluation at Patuxent River. The Navy test pilots reportedly complained, and the sport ceased. But it had made Vought partisans feel a little better.”

Michael Peck is a contributing writer for the National Interest. He can be found on Twitter and Facebook.

Image: South Korean Air Force F-4E. Wikimedia Commons/Creative Commons/Republic of Korea Armed Forces


Will Crusader Kings 3 Factor In The Importance of Faith?

Religious piety was a central part of medieval life, embraced by both peasants and kings, while institutions of faith frequently cultivated literacy and helped administer the kingdoms whose spiritual welfare they tended. Crusader Kings II and III both effectively capture the importance of faith in the Middle Ages through some clever gameplay incentives. Faithful observance, pilgrimages, and the funding of Temples can increase the player's Piety statistic, while heretical actions might get them smacked with an excommunication. Crusader Kings III is set to expand CK II's already impressive religion system with a series of new denominations to choose from, plus the ability for players to form their own (possibly heretical) faith.


Crusader Kings III: The Kotaku Review

Crusader Kings III is a game that takes in 600 years of human history, from the 9th century through to the 15th, with all the geopolitical conflict, religious turmoil and interpersonal struggles that went along with it. So. where do we even begin with this game, let along this review?

How about with a quick history lesson—of the series, not the actual time period, relax—because what makes Crusader Kings III so special is going to require a quick understanding of what made its predecessor, a revolutionary strategy game, so good in the first place.

Crusader Kings III is the direct sequel to 2012's Crusader Kings II, which I nominated for Kotaku’s Game of the Year back then, and then for around five years after that as well . At first glance it was just another Paradox Interactive grand strategy game, like Hearts of Iron or Europa Universalis , something terribly niche and with all the buttons and menus and abstract complexity that implied.

Why Crusader Kings II Should Be Game Of The Year

It's easy. Because it's the only game on this list that's about sex and politics.

Unlike the studio’s other, admittedly drier experiences, though, Crusader Kings II had heart. The entire game was built upon a vast network of relationships, with every person of note in the game, from the lowest official to the mightiest ruler, having their own distinct personality and traits. Everything you did in the game, everything you were and stood for, impacted how everyone else thought of you, and more importantly, how they reacted to you when it came time to deal with them.

It was a military and economic strategy game, sure, in that you could go to war and build stuff. But really, Crusader Kings II was a game about drama, since almost everything you did revolved around people, not states or Kingdoms.

Crusader Kings II was an incredible achievement, but it wasn’t without its flaws. It took a lot of work to be able to understand how the game’s relationship systems—based simply on positive and negative factors, like “we have the same religion, so that’s +10"—and even more work figuring out how to tame the game’s leather-doublet-thick interface.

After releasing it in 2012, Paradox spent the following years endlessly expanding the game in almost every way imaginable. The map got bigger, we got more customisation options, new religions were added, the Vikings got some time in the spotlight, as did Jews, and things probably peaked around the time you could marry a horse . By 2019, Crusader Kings II was positively creaking under the weight of so much content.

And so here we are in 2020. Not with another Crusader Kings II expansion, but with a whole new Crusader Kings game, one that dials back a lot of that bloat and has an opportunity to start things over. In doing so, it has a big legacy to live up to. How do you improve on a game that was so perfect in so many ways, but such a disaster in others?

Easy. You just keep the perfect bits and improve everything else.

Crusader Kings III is immense. It lets you begin in the 9th century and play right through to the late medieval period in the 15th century. That’s a very European timeframe, one designed to coincide with the titular Crusades, a journey from the ruins of the Roman Empire to the doorsteps of the Renaissance, but it’s important to note that this isn’t a strictly European affair.

While Crusader Kings II took a number of expansions to broaden its scope, Crusader Kings III kicks off with an enormous block of the old world available to play. So sure, you can start as an Irish or German Prince, but you can also take the reigns in places as distant as Ghana, the Middle East, India and even China.

Some of those places, like Byzantium, will begin proceedings incredibly advanced, while others, like much of Scandinavia, will begin as tribes. Whichever you choose, it’s up to you to then guide your people through 600 years of turbulence, and when I say people, I literally mean a bunch of people.

In Crusader Kings III you’re not a persistent, omnipotent ruler who is in charge of a singular “Scotland” or “Spain” for the duration of the game. You’re cast as a member of a dynastic house, and so what you’re able to take over and rule depends on the fortunes of that family and the people it’s comprised of.

Get everything running smoothly and you could rise from the ranks of Earl to Emperor, but there’s nothing stopping the game from putting somebody else on the throne and bringing you right back down again, leaving you destitute and in control of little more than a church and a couple of farms.

Crusader Kings III can operate on a few different levels. You can play it as a standard Paradox strategy game and just “paint the map”, your only goal being to raise armies and take over neighbour after neighbour. If that’s what you want to do, that’s fine, the game will let you and it’ll be fun, but it’s also kind of missing the point of what Crusader Kings is all about.

The game is made up of people because that’s where the real action is. A lot of your time in Crusader Kings III is spent not on the battlefield but at court and various events, as you grease wheels, impress guests, terrify vassals, seduce heirs and discipline children. It’s here, in the decisions you make on a personal level, that the world is truly shaped. When England talks to France it’s not some generic diplomatic screen, it’s me talking to Francois or whatever his name is, and maybe we get along because my daughter is married to his uncle, or maybe we don’t because of that one time I asked him to convert to Catharism and he told me I would never find solace in heaven.

The shape of the game’s world is forged by these interactions, and aside from more conventional forms of communication you can also engage in intrigue events as varied as plotting to murder a rival (or an heir), blackmailing your vassals and even kidnapping folks.

Or, if you’re not an asshole, you can befriend people, which includes such wholesome activities as talking a walk in the garden with them, writing them letters and even, if you can handle it, getting completely hammered with them.

Every single one of these actions can have important results, and they’re all completely valid ways to approach your relationships in the game. I’m going to go on and on listing these actions throughout this review, but even when I said you could just “paint the map” and be happy, you can do that with more than just armies. You can become a religious zealot and instigate Holy Wars, fabricate claims in neighbouring lands and even ask the Pope (or relevant religious leader) to call a Crusade and share in the spoils.

There’s just so much freedom here, to the point where Crusader Kings III strains at the very definitions of its genre. To call this a “strategy game” just doesn’t do it justice, since between your armies and economy and kids and spouse and religion and spies and booze and hunting trips and jousting tournaments and failed attempts to write family histories (all of which you can do, or at least attempt), there are times Crusader Kings III feels like playing 3-4 different games all at once.

Moment-to-moment, I have loved almost every second I’ve spent with Crusader Kings III, across multiple campaigns, because it lets me play the game however I want, and never tells me what I’m doing is anything less than ideal. If I want to be a distant, hands-off King and ignore loads of stuff to solely concentrate on subjugating foreign lands, I can do that, and if I suffer the consequences, they’re not bad ones.

To be dethroned in Crusader Kings III isn’t to “lose”. The wild and different aspects of this game all come together in each campaign to tell a story, and so whether you’re overseeing a great triumph or a humiliating reverse, everything that happens to you in this game feels like being taken through a grand historical novel that’s never told the same way twice.

Let’s say I don’t want to be hands-off, though. That I want to be very hands-on. When this is the case there are no shortage of things to do, and very few—outside maybe the upgrading of buildings—of them feel like administrative tedium.

As ruler I can (here we go, I’m listing again) raise and then personally lead armies around the map. I can dive into the relationships I’m having with all my vassals, swooning over some, dining with others and imprisoning the real troublemakers. I can create an all-new religion, from its tenets to its iconography, and these can have enormous knock-on effects to my gameplay experience, not to mention affecting whether my (or my family’s) character traits are considered virtues or sins.

I can expand my personal holdings, like castles and cities. I can tend to my succession laws, the state of my heirs and any alliances I might be able to broker by marrying off my kids. I can engage in clandestine schemes, seeking to influence events or even murder people behind the scenes. I can invite everyone I know over to my hall for a lavish feast, or I can take a few months off an visit Jerusalem on a pilgrimage, publicly to display my piousness, but privately because I am sucking up to the Pope and need his help.

I keep discussing these possibilities simply to put the amount of things you can do into context, because no matter how trivial any of it sounds, every single piece of it goes towards making you who you are. It all means something, generating the values that drive the game’s relationship and personality systems, serving both as a constant challenge to my leadership, but also a reflection of it.

Like with Crusader Kings II, Crusader Kings III’s personalities are constructed of numerical values and traits, each of them affected by the choices you make and how they relate to the values and principles of everyone around you. Previously, though, coupled with static and repetitive character portraits, the game could feel like flicking through an abacus at times, a bit too mechanical for its own good. Here, it feels much more personal.

Gone are those tiny 2D portraits, which often meant important characters would go unremarked and forgotten amongst the crowd. They’ve been replaced with much bigger, fully-realised 3D models of. every single person in the world, and then every single person they’ll raise, and so on and so on.

Built out of a much wider variety of faces, physiques and wardrobe choices, everyone—and that is thousands upon thousands of people—in Crusader Kings III feels alive, and more importantly, they’re distinct and memorable. You can very quickly learn to recognise troublesome vassals or squabbling family members just by getting a quick look at their face, and the way they age, or become wounded after battle, or gaunt when ill or in prison, is just wonderful (in terms of us admiring the the system, I mean, not the fact they’re rotting away in a prison, that sounds terrible).

This sounds like such a minor, superficial thing, but it transforms the Crusader Kings experience. Taking what was previously a very “living tissue over metal endoskeleton” system and fleshing it out to this extent makes dealing with people—this game’s bread and butter—far more relatable, in the same way Civilization’s expressive characters have long helped that series’ stunted diplomacy feel so much more animated than it has any right to be.

Probably my favourite part of Crusader Kings III’s more personal approach is the expansion of the series’ lifestyle focus. It’s a system where every time you get a new ruler to play as, you’re given a chance to tailor that person’s leadership style to your liking. There are five different lifestyles you can focus on—based on scheming, war, management, diplomacy or education—with the idea being that the longer you keep your ruler alive and keep playing, the more perks they’ll be able to unlock, granting you gameplay bonuses and statistical perks related to that particular field’s part of the game.

This is what I mean when I said this is 3-4 games in one. It’s a strategy game where you’re also playing an RPG, giving your guys and gals a real sense of character to go along with just the faces and stats that are defining them.

It’s just so fucking cool. You can spend decades running the Kingdom like a complete psycho, shaping your ruler into a child-killing lunatic who worships the devil and gets into drunken brawls, but when that guy inevitably dies and you start playing as their heir, you get to start all over again. Maybe their daughter (now you) is a pious nerd, and suddenly the entire game shifts on its axis.

If the last King excelled at intrigue, the in-game events and choices they were given—along with their natural statistical predisposition towards those kind of activities—would mean you spent a lot of the game in the shadows. Play as a diplomatic leader, though, and even though you’re in control of the same Kingdom, you’re doing things they could never have done (literally, it would have been almost impossible) like chatting with bishops, and doing business with your neighbours, and wanting nothing to do with any of that unpleasantness your predecessor was known for.

And when that ruler dies, and their heir is a gifted General (again, this is now you), then everything changes again! You might find yourself leading the charge as a militaristic King, ignoring other options like pursuing goals diplomatically and instead just walking up to every domain you fancy and saying yes, please, I’ll straight up take this, bestowed with aggressive perks that your forebears simply couldn’t take advantage of.

So it’s an RPG as well as a strategy game, where the role you’re playing changes all the time, but then every time the role changes, the strategy game part changes as well. And every time it changes it’s a blast.

Alright, we’re far enough into this and have covered so much of the fun stuff that it’s time to talk about the interface. Boring, I know, but it’s also something that’s critically important to a heavyweight strategy game, and also something Paradox titles have long struggled with. The challenge with Crusader Kings in particular has always been that it’s a game about emotions and feelings, but which still had to operate within the constraints of an engine that was made for more straight-laced strategy games.

Crusader Kings II had too many buttons, too much clicking, confusing icons, argh, it was not fun to spend a large amount of time with, and that’s coming from someone quite comfortable with this kind of game. It was very intimidating to anyone who wasn’t, and one of my greatest frustrations of the past decade has been recommending Crusader Kings II to folks I know would adore the politics, only for them to tell me, “I would rather die horrifically than learn how to play this. ”

Crusader Kings III is a huge improvement in this regard, mostly because it’s taken what’s mostly the same systems (and even buttons) and just organised everything a lot more cleanly and intuitively. The things you need to know right now are displayed accordingly, the buttons you need to go to the most important places are big and coloured, and anything to do with you personally is accessed by. a giant portrait of yourself. It also helps that the menus are now very nice and modern, very Civilization with their blue backgrounds and gold text.

That’s all minor quality-of-life stuff though, and is probably only really interesting to series veterans. What I think will help everybody out, though, even experienced players who might need some help grappling with Crusader Kings III’s changes, are the game’s pop-ups. Continuing the single best trend in modern strategy gaming, after Three Kingdom’s pioneering work last year , Crusader Kings III will explain pretty much anything you need to know just by hovering the mouse over a dialogue window. Sometimes that’ll just be a handy little tip, other times you’ll get an exhaustive rundown of a key feature that saves you from having to google something.


Crusader III - History

OLDER THAN DIRT.
Guaranteed Authentic.

Ancient Coins & Artifacts:

Crusader Kings of Antioch:
A fantastic selection of hammered silver Crusader coins!
The obverse depicts the Crusader king Bohemond III in full battle-dress, wearing chain-maille and helmet with cross, the reverse with a large central "Latin" Crusader cross. Each was hand-hammered over 800 years ago. These are stunning and affordable examples of Medieval iconography!
Crusader Kings of Antioch
King Bohemond III. 1162 - 1201 AD. Silver denier.
Helmeted head of king in chain-maille armor, crescent and star to sides, + BOAMVNDVS / Cross patee, crescent in quadrant, + ANTIOCHIA. 18mm, 0.94 g. ref: Metcalf 387, CCS 68. Black patina with silvery highlights. ex London, UK gallery. #CM2621: $250
Crusader Kings of Antioch
King Bohemond III. 1162 - 1201 AD. Silver denier.
Helmeted head of king in chain-maille armor, crescent and star to sides, + BOAMVNDVS / Cross patee, crescent in quadrant, + ANTIOCHIA. 18.49 mm, 0.89 g. ref: Metcalf 387, CCS 68. Near VF. Includes old collector envelope. #CM2383: $250
Crusader Kings of Antioch
King Bohemond III. 1162 - 1201 AD. Silver denier.
Helmeted head of king in chain-maille armor, crescent and star to sides, + BOAMVNDVS / Cross patee, crescent in quadrant, + ANTIOCHIA. 18 mm, 0.71 g. ref: Metcalf 387, CCS 68. ex-De Pere, WI collection. Light gray patina, earthen deposits. A lot nicer than this dark and grainy photo allows! #CM2592: $175
Crusader Kings of Antioch
King Bohemond III. 1162 - 1201 AD. Billon denier.
Helmeted head of king in chain-maille armor, crescent and star to sides, + BOAMVNDVS / Cross patee, crescent in quadrant, + ANTIOCHIA. 17 mm, 0.85 g. ref: Metcalf 387, CCS 68. ex De Pere, WI collection. Nice looking coin, better than photo! #CM2654: $175
Crusader Kings of Antioch
King Bohemond III. 1162 - 1201 AD. Silver denier.
Helmeted head of king in chain-maille armor, crescent and star to sides, + BOAMVNDVS / Cross patee, crescent in quadrant, + ANTIOCHIA. 19mm, 0.75 g. ref: Metcalf 387, CCS 68. ex-De Pere, WI collection. Light gray patina. #CM2616: $175
Crusader Kings of Antioch
King Bohemond III. 1162 - 1201 AD. Billon denier.
Helmeted head of king in chain-maille armor, crescent and star to sides, + BOAMVNDVS / Cross patee, crescent in quadrant, + ANTIOCHIA. 18 mm, 0.82 g. ref: Metcalf 387, CCS 68. ex De Pere, WI collection. #CM2657: $199
Crusader Kings of Antioch
King Bohemond III. 1162 - 1201 AD. Billon denier.
Helmeted head of king in chain-maille armor, crescent and star to sides, + BOAMVNDVS / Cross patee, crescent in quadrant, + ANTIOCHIA. 18 mm, 0.96 g. ref: Metcalf 387, CCS 68. ex De Pere, WI collection. #CM2658: $199
Crusader Kings of Antioch
King Bohemond III. 1162 - 1201 AD. Billon denier.
Helmeted head of king in chain-maille armor, crescent and star to sides, + BOAMVNDVS / Cross patee, crescent in quadrant, + ANTIOCHIA. 18 mm, 0.92 g. ref: Metcalf 387, CCS 68. ex De Pere, WI collection. Nice! #CM2659: $250
Crusader Kings of Antioch
King Bohemond III. 1162 - 1201 AD. Billon denier.
Helmeted head of king in chain-maille armor, crescent and star to sides, + BOAMVNDVS / Cross patee, crescent in quadrant, + ANTIOCHIA. 17 mm, 0.76 g. Heavy earthen deposits. ref: Metcalf 387, CCS 68. ex De Pere, WI collection. #CM2667: $175
Crusader Kings of Antioch
King Bohemond III. 1162 - 1201 AD. Billon denier.
Helmeted head of king in chain-maille armor, crescent and star to sides, + BOAMVNDVS / Cross patee, crescent in quadrant, + ANTIOCHIA. 18 mm, 0.90 g. ref: Metcalf 387, CCS 68. ex De Pere, WI collection. #CM2681: $150
Crusader Kings of Antioch
King Bohemond III. 1162 - 1201 AD. Billon denier.
Helmeted head of king in chain-maille armor, crescent and star to sides, + BOAMVNDVS / Cross patee, crescent in quadrant, + ANTIOCHIA. 19 mm, 0.93 g. Light earthen deposits. ref: Metcalf 387, CCS 68. ex De Pere, WI collection. Nicer than photo! #CM2682: $150
Crusader Kings of Antioch
King Bohemond III. 1162 - 1201 AD. Billon denier.
Helmeted head of king in chain-maille armor, crescent and star to sides, + BOAMVNDVS / Cross patee, crescent in quadrant, + ANTIOCHIA. 18 mm, 1.08 g. ref: Metcalf 387, CCS 68. ex De Pere, WI collection. #CM2695: $250
Crusader Kings of Antioch
King Bohemond III. 1162 - 1201 AD. Billon denier.
Helmeted head of king in chain-maille armor, crescent and star to sides, + BOAMVNDVS / Cross patee, crescent in quadrant, + ANTIOCHIA. 18 mm, 1.00 g. ref: Metcalf 387, CCS 68. Top edge is intact, the black area was an artifact of the photo cropping. ex De Pere, WI collection. #CM2697: $275
Crusader Kings of Antioch
King Bohemond III. 1162 - 1201 AD. Billon denier.
Helmeted head of king in chain-maille armor, crescent and star to sides, + BOAMVNDVS / Cross patee, crescent in quadrant, + ANTIOCHIA. 17 mm, 0.92 g. ref: Metcalf 387, CCS 68. ex De Pere, WI collection. #CM2698: $299
Crusader Kings of Antioch. Bohémond III, 1149-1163 AD. Silver Class C denier. Young male head right, + BOAMVNDVS / Crusader cross pattée, + ANTIOCHIA. 16mm, 0.85 g. ref: Metcalf, Crusades 350 CCS 34. VF, toned, near-black patina. ex-London, UK collection. Nice example of a rarer type! #CM2535: $225
Crusader Kings of Antioch
King Bohemond III. 1162 - 1201 AD. Billon denier.
Helmeted head of king in chain-maille armor, crescent and star to sides, + BOAMVNDVS / Cross patee, crescent in quadrant, + ANTIOCHIA. 18 mm diameter. ref: Metcalf 387, CCS 68. Slabbed and certified About Uncirculated Details by NGC! ex De Pere, WI collection. Fantastic coin. #CM2668: $350
Crusader Kings of Antioch
King Bohemond III. 1162 - 1201 AD. Billon denier.
Helmeted head of king in chain-maille armor, crescent and star to sides, + BOAMVNDVS / Cross patee, crescent in quadrant, + ANTIOCHIA. 18 mm diameter. ref: Metcalf 387, CCS 68. Slabbed and certified About Uncirculated Details by NGC! ex De Pere, WI collection. Great detail! #CM2669: $350
Crusader Kings of Antioch
King Bohemond III. 1162 - 1201 AD. Billon denier.
Helmeted head of king in chain-maille armor, crescent and star to sides, + BOAMVNDVS / Cross patee, crescent in quadrant, + ANTIOCHIA. 18 mm diameter. ref: Metcalf 387, CCS 68. Slabbed and certified Extremely Fine by NGC! ex De Pere, WI collection. Nice detail! #CM2674: $350
Crusader Kings of Antioch
King Bohemond III. 1162 - 1201 AD. Billon denier.
Helmeted head of king in chain-maille armor, crescent and star to sides, + BOAMVNDVS / Cross patee, crescent in quadrant, + ANTIOCHIA. 18 mm diameter. ref: Metcalf 387, CCS 68. Slabbed and certified About Uncirculated by NGC! ex De Pere, WI collection. Gorgeous! #CM2673: $350
Crusader Kings of Antioch
King Bohemond III. 1162 - 1201 AD. Billon denier.
Helmeted head of king in chain-maille armor, crescent and star to sides, + BOAMVNDVS / Cross patee, crescent in quadrant, + ANTIOCHIA. 18mm, 0.92 g. ref: Metcalf 387, CCS 68. Excellent detail! ex De Pere, WI collection. #CM2727: $275
Crusader Kings of Antioch
King Bohemond III. 1162 - 1201 AD. Billon denier.
Helmeted head of king in chain-maille armor, crescent and star to sides, + BOAMVNDVS / Cross patee, crescent in quadrant, + ANTIOCHIA. 18mm, 0.92 g. ref: Metcalf 387, CCS 68. Nice detail. ex De Pere, WI collection. #CM2725: $250
Medieval Hungary, time of the Crusades. Bela II, 1131-1142 AD. Silver denar, set into a custom .925 silver swivel-ring. Each side of the coin depicts a central cross with inscription around. Coin ref: Huszar 102. Ring a US size 7 1/2, bezel 15mm diameter. The bezel swivels so either side of the coin can be worn facing “out”! An excellent piece of wearable history! Coin choice Extremely Fine, ex-Robin Danziger, NY. #CM2390: $199
Crusader Kings of Antioch. King Bohemond III. 1162 - 1201 AD. Silver denier, set into custom silver bezel. Helmeted head of king in chain-maille armor, crescent and star to sides, + BOAIIVNDVS / Cross patee, crescent in quadrant, + ANTIOCNIA. ref: Metcalf, Crusades 371 CCS 65. 19 mm dia. Very nice! Excellent detail, great tone. #CM2081: $325 SOLD - Ask about alternates!
SEE ALSO:
COINS FROM THE CRUSADER KINGS OF JERUSALEM!
SEE ALSO:
CRUSADER CONSTANTINOPLE COINS
SEE ALSO:
RICHARD I THE LIONHEART CRUSADER COINS!
SEE ALSO:
CRUSADER COINS OF KNIGHTS TEMPLAR FRANCE
Crusader Genoa, Italy. 1139-1252 AD.
Silver denaro struck under Conrad III, set into a stunning .925 silver bezel. Coin depicts: Tower of Jerusalem, city name IANVA / Crusader cross, king's name CVNRADI REX. ref: Cross V.16 Biaggi 835 for type. Total diameter 21 mm (7/8”). Nice gray cabinet tone, good detail. Coin ex-De Pere, WI collection. #CM2758:
SOLD - Ask about alternate!
Crusader Genoa, Italy. 1139-1252 AD. Silver denaro struck under Conrad III. Tower of Jerusalem, city name IANVA / Crusader cross, king's name CVNRADI REX. 15.8 mm, 0.79 g. ref: Biaggi 835 CNI 2/21 MIR 16. EF for type, well struck and lightly toned. Sharp detail! #CM2411: $199
Crusader Genoa, Italy. 1139-1252 AD. Silver denaro struck under Conrad III. Tower of Jerusalem, city name IANVA / Crusader cross, king's name CVNRADI REX. 16.5 mm, 0.80 g. ref: Cross V.16. B.835. Great silvery tone, excellent detail. #CM2415: $199
Crusader Genoa, Italy. 1139-1252 AD. Silver denaro struck under Conrad III. Tower of Jerusalem, city name IANVA / Crusader cross, king's name CVNRADI REX. 16.5 mm, 0.80 g. ref: Cross V.16. B.835. 17mm, 0.80 g. ex De Père, WI collection. #CM2653: $175
Crusader Achaea, Frankish Greece. Philip of Savoy, 1301-1306 AD. Billon denier tournois. Crusader cross pattée, + PhS D’ SAB P ACHE / Castle tournois, 5-pointed star below, + DE CLARENCIA. 18 mm, 0.80 g. ref: Malloy, CCS 20. Possibly from the Pylia Hoard. Good VF. ex-Robin Danziger, NY. #CM2398: $150
Crusader Achaea, Frankish Greece. Philip of Savoy, 1301-1306 AD. Billon denier tournois, set into custom silver bezel. Crusader cross pattée, + PhS D’ SAB P ACHE / Castle tournois, 5-pointed star below, + DE CLARENCIA. ref: Malloy, CCS 20. 24 mm dia (total). Coin possibly from the Pylia Hoard ex-Robin Danziger, NY. #CM2394: $350
Crusader Achaea, Frankish Greece. Philip of Savoy, 1301-1306 AD. Billon denier tournois, set into custom silver bezel. Crusader cross pattée, + PhS D’ SAB P ACHE / Castle tournois, 5-pointed star below, + DE CLARENCIA. ref: Malloy, CCS 20. 24 mm dia (total). Coin possibly from the Pylia Hoard. Good VF. ex-Robin Danziger, NY. #CM2393: $350
Crusaders. Latin Crusader Rulers of Constantinople, c. 1204-1261 AD. Billon Trachy coin. Facing bust of Christ, holding Gospels and raising right hand / Archangel Michael standing facing, holding cross on globe. 15 mm, 0.78 g. ref: DOC 16 SB 2036. Deep coppery tone. #CM2403: $125
Crusaders. Latin rulers of Constantinople, 1204-1261 AD. Billon Trachy. Facing beardless bust of Christ / Emperor standing facing. 19mm, 1.50 g. ref: Hahn 29,14 SB 2048. VF. Ex London Ancient Coins Ltd. Excellent detail for these! #CM2753: $175
Crusader-Period France. Charles IV, 1322-1328 AD. Silver maille blanche. Crusader cross pattee, + KAROLVS REX + BHDICTV: SIT: NOME: DNI: NRI / Châtel tournois, border of twelve lis, + FRANCHORVM. 22x23mm, 1.74 g. ref: Duplessy 243. Sharp detail, gunmetal-gray toning. Charles IV was the last son of Philippe IV le Bel (patron king of the Knights Templar) and last of the Capetian rulers of France. ex-UK collection. #CM2447: $250
Crusader-Period France. Charles IV, 1322-1328 AD. Silver maille blanche. Crusader cross pattee, + KAROLVS REX + BHDICTV: SIT: NOME: DNI: NRI / Châtel tournois, border of twelve lis, + FRANCHORVM. 23mm, 1.78 g. Nicely centered, light gray cabinet tone. ref: Duplessy 243. Charles IV was the last son of Philippe IV le Bel (patron king of the Knights Templar) and last of the Capetian rulers of France. ex-UK collection. #CM2443: $250
Crusader-Period France. Charles IV, 1322-1328 AD. Silver maille blanche struck c. 1326 AD. Crusader cross pattee, + KAROLVS REX + BHDICTV: SIT: NOME: DNI: NRI / Châtel tournois, border of twelve lis, + FRANCHORVM. 23mm, 2.03 g. nice detail, light gray cabinet tone. ref: Duplessy 243. Charles IV was the last son of Philippe IV le Bel (patron king of the Knights Templar) and last of the Capetian rulers of France. ex-Bourg en Bresse, Rhône-Alpes, France collection. #CM2465: $250
Medieval France, Crusades period. Perigord, c. 1200-1250 AD. Billon denier, , set into custom .925 silver bezel. Cross with V and S in opposite angles + LODOICVS / Five annulets in cruciform pattern + EGOLISSIME. 19.5mm dia. VF with attractive cabinet tone. ref: Roberts 4349. Coin ex-London, UK collection. #CM2462: $299
Crusader-Period France. Charles IV, 1322-1328 AD. Silver maille blanche. Set into custom .925 silver bezel. Crusader cross pattee, + KAROLVS REX + BHDICTV: SIT: NOME: DNI: NRI / Châtel tournois, border of twelve lis, + FRANCHORVM. W: 23mm, weighs 2.79 grams (total). ref: Duplessy 243. Sharp detail, light gray cabinet tone with some darker areas. Charles IV was the last son of Philippe IV le Bel (patron king of the Knights Templar) and last of the Capetian rulers of France. Coin ex-London, UK collection. #CM2468: $299
Crusader Achaea. Frankish Greece.
Philip I of Taranto. 1306 - 1313 AD
Billon denier. Crusader cross, + PHS PACH TAR DR / Crusader castle tournois, with fleur-de-lis and two pellets, DE CLARENCIA. 19 mm, 0.84 g. Dark silvery tone, light earthen deposits. ex-De Pere, WI collection. #CM2515: $99
Crusader Achaea, Frankish Greece. Philip of Savoy, 1301-1306 AD. Billon denier tournois, set into custom silver bezel. Crusader cross pattée, + PhS D’ SAB P ACHE / Castle tournois, 5-pointed star below, + DE CLARENCIA. ref: Malloy, CCS 20. 25 mm dia (total). Coin possibly from the Pylia Hoard ex-Robin Danziger, NY. #CM2397: $299
Crusader France. Philip VI of Valois, 1328-1350 AD. Silver Gros à la couronne. Cross pattée, PHILIPPVS REX / Castle tournois. 25x20mm, 2.07 g. ref: Duplessy 262. ex-De Pere, WI collection. Great cross! #CM2612: $125
Crusader France. Philip VI of Valois, 1328-1350 AD. Silver Gros à la couronne. Cross pattée, PHILIPPVS REX / Castle tournois. 24mm, 2.26 g. ref: Duplessy 262. Bright silvery tone, some small green deposits. ex-De Pere, WI collection. #CM2637: $150
Crusaders Athens, Frankish Greece. William de la Roche, 1280-1287 AD. Billon denier tournois. Cross patee. + C DVX ATENES / Castle tournois with two arches and open circle at each corner, THEBE CIVIS. 19 mm, 0.51 g. ref: Malloy, CSS p. 385 #84. ex-Guildcraft, purchased in 1991. Terrible photo! #CM2088: $99
Crusader Achaea. Frankish Greece.
Philip I of Taranto. 1306 - 1313 AD. Billon denier. Crusader cross, + PHS PACH TAR DR / Crusader castle tournois, with fleur-de-lis and two pellets, DE CLARENCIA. 19mm, 0.81 g. Dark gray tone. ex-De Pere, WI collection. #CM2520: $99
Crusader Achaea. Frankish Greece.
Philip I of Taranto. 1306 - 1313 AD. Billon denier. Crusader cross, + PHS PACH TAR DR / Crusader castle tournois, with fleur-de-lis and two pellets, DE CLARENCIA. 19.5mm, 0.76 g. Dark gray tone. ex-De Pere, WI collection. #CM2521: $99
Crusader France. Philippe VI de Valois, 1328-1350 AD. Large silver Gros a la queue. Chatel tournois, TVRONVS CIVIS border of twelve lis / Latin cross, + PHILIPPVS REX around. Large 27x28 mm, 2.11 g. ref: Duplessy 265. Very nice! Beautiful detail, nice cabinet tone and great character! #80904: $299
Medieval Hungary, time of the Crusades. Bela II, 1131-1142 AD. Silver denar, set into a custom .925 silver swivel-ring. Each side of the coin depicts a central cross with inscription around. Coin ref: Huszar 102. Ring a US size 7 1/2, bezel 15mm diameter. The bezel swivels so either side of the coin can be worn facing “out”! An excellent piece of wearable history! Coin choice Extremely Fine, ex-Robin Danziger, NY. #CM2389: $350

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Crusaders, Venetians in the Levant. Under doge Andrea Dandolo, c. 1344-1382 AD. Gold Ducat, imitating Venice. Christ standing facing, raising hand in benediction and holding Gospels, surrounded by elliptical halo containing four stars to left, five to right pellet between feet, TACVCE TSISI : GP • VT • Q‘TAC • EP XTTIS / Saint Mark standing right, holding Gospels and presenting banner containing two pellets to Doge kneeling left, DVX down flag staff, SZVENETI (horizontal)/ VECBCANCVTO. 21mm, 3.49 g. Ref: CNI VII 37 (for type) cf. Ives pl. XIII (same) cf. Gamberini 344 (Roberto d’Angio pr. Acaia). Near EF, slightly clipped. From the Prue Morgan Fitts Collection. Ex Classical Numismatic Review XXVII (Summer 2002), no. 89. #CM2199: $1200 SOLD

Crusader Epirus, Frankish Greece. Philip of Taranto, 1294-1313 AD. Billon denier tournois, struck before 1306. Crusader cross pattée, + Ph’S P TAR DESP / Castle tournois with two arches, NEPANTI CIVIS. 18 mm, 0.79 g. ref: Malloy, CCS p. 397, 111a. ex-Robin Danziger, NY. #CM2401: $125 SOLD
Crusader Epirus, Frankish Greece. Philip of Taranto, 1294-1313 AD. Billon denier tournois, struck before 1306. Crusader cross pattée, + Ph’S P TAR DESP / Castle tournois with two arches, NEPANTI CIVIS. 19 mm, 0.68 g. ref: Malloy, CCS p. 397, 111a. ex-Robin Danziger, NY. #CM2400: $99 SOLD
Crusader France. King Philip VI de Valois. Silver Gros a la Fleur struck 1341-1342 AD. Crusader cross with fleur-de-lis, + PHILIPPVS REX + B[NDI]CTV: SIT: NOME: DNI: N[RI:] DEI / Large fleur-de-lis, small cross above, border of 11 lis, + FRANCORVM. 22 mm, 1.94 g. ref: C.304 L.267-267b Dy.263-263B. Gray patina, light earthen deposits. ex-London, UK collection. #CM2463: $150 SOLD
Crusader States, County of Tripoli. Raymond II-III. 1137-1187 AD. Billon denier, struck c. late 1140s-1164. + RA[M]VNDVS COMS, cross pattée, pellet in 1st and 2nd quarters / CIVI[TAS T]RIPOLIS, eight-rayed star with pellets above crescent. ref: CCS 6-8 Metcalf 509. 15 mm, 0.71 g. #CM2191: $175 SOLD
Crusader Genoa, Italy. 1139-1252 AD.
Silver denaro struck under Conrad III, set into a stunning .925 silver bezel and adjustable 16 1/2" to 18 1/2" silver foxtail necklace. Coin depicts: Tower of Jerusalem, city name IANVA / Crusader cross, king's name CVNRADI REX. ref: Cross V.16 Biaggi 835. Bezel diameter 24 mm (15/16"). Nice gray cabinet tone, excellent detail. #CM2377: $450 SOLD
Crusader-Period France. Charles IV, 1322-1328 AD. Silver maille blanche. Set into custom .925 silver bezel. Crusader cross pattee, + KAROLVS REX + BHDICTV: SIT: NOME: DNI: NRI / Châtel tournois, border of twelve lis, + FRANCHORVM. W: 23.5mm, weighs 2.81 grams (total). ref: Duplessy 243. Sharp detail, dark gray cabinet tone. Charles IV was the last son of Philippe IV le Bel (patron king of the Knights Templar) and last of the Capetian rulers of France. Coin ex-London, UK collection. #CM2469: $325 SOLD Crusader States. 11th-13th century AD. Large lead dirhem, Acre mint. Found in the Holy Land! The front with a large Crusader cross with raised pellet in center, surrounded by two concentric rings. ref: TMA type II. VF. 28.1 mm, 5.43 g. Nice white patina, terrible mis-colored photo. From the Kenneth Miller Collection of Ake-Ptolemais and Related Biblical Coins. #CM2202: $225 SOLD

Crusader France. Philippe VI de Valois, 1328-1350 AD. Silver Gros a la Fleur, set into custom .925 silver bezel. Crusader cross, small fleur-de-lis in quadrant, + PHILIPPVS REX around exterior legend: + BnDICTV: SIT: nOmE: DnI: nRI: D / Large fleur-de-lis, + FRANCORVM border of twelve lis. 25mm diameter. ref: Ciani 304. Light gray tone. Coin ex-London, UK collection. #CM2459: $350 SOLD
Crusader Kings of Antioch. Bohémond III, 1149-1163 AD. Silver Class C denier. Young male head right, + BOAMVNDVS / Crusader cross pattée, + ANTIOCHIA. 16.5mm, 0.89 g. ref: Metcalf, Crusades 350 CCS 34. VF, toned. From the estate of Thomas Bentley Cederlind. Ex Cederlind 164 (16 May 2012), lot 383 ex-CNG. #CM2333: $250 SOLD
Crusader France & Britain. Richard I the Lionheart. Count of Poitou and Duke of Aquitaine 1172-1185 AD, King of England 1189-1199 AD. Billon denier, Melle mint (Deux-Sevres) mint. Cross pattee, +RICARDVS REX / PICTAVIENSIS in three lines across field. ref: Elias 8. 20 mm, 0.96 g. Nice gray cabinet-tone. Well-centered. ex-Nick Jamgochian private collection, Glendale, CA, purchased November 1952, with original envelope! #CM2577: $275 SOLD
Crusader Kings of Antioch
King Bohemond III. 1162 - 1201 AD. Silver denier.
Helmeted head of king in chain-maille armor, crescent and star to sides, + BOAMVNDVS / Cross patee, crescent in quadrant, + ANTIOCHIA. 18mm, 0.84 g. ref: Metcalf 387, CCS 68. Slightly crimped corner. ex De Pere, WI collection. Light gray patina. #CM2641: $199 SOLD
Medieval France (post-Crusades). Charles VI, 1380-1422 AD. Silver Blanc Guenar. Set into custom silver bezel. Large cross with crowns and lis in quarters, "SIT NOME DNI BENEDICTV" around / Coat of arms with three lis, “KAROLVS FRANCORV REX”. ref: Roberts 2981. Dia: 29mm, nice detail, light silvery tone. ex-London, UK collection. Very nice! #CM2512: $ 399 SOLD
Crusader Kings of Antioch
King Bohemond III. 1162 - 1201 AD. Billon denier.
Helmeted head of king in chain-maille armor, crescent and star to sides, + BOAMVNDVS / Cross patee, crescent in quadrant, + ANTIOCHIA. 17 mm, 0.78 g. ref: Metcalf 387, CCS 68. ex De Pere, WI collection. #CM2696: $299 SOLD


Crusader Kings of Antioch Bohémond IV or Bohémond V. 1201-1251 AD. Billon Denier. Class O. Antioch mint. Struck c. 1225-1250 AD. Helmeted head left crescent to left, star to right + BOAMVNDVS / Crusader cross pattée crescent facing downward in second angle + ANTIOCHIA. 17mm, 0.92 g. ref: Metcalf, Crusades 457-61 CCS 126. Good VF, lightly toned, areas of weak strike at periphery. #CM2323: $299 SOLD
Crusader Kings of Antioch
King Bohemond III. 1162 - 1201 AD. Silver denier. Helmeted head of king in chain-maille armor, crescent and star to sides, + BOAIIVNDVS / Cross patee, crescent in quadrant, + ANTIOCNIA. Excellent coin! Sharp detail, nice toning. ex-Classical Numismatic Group (CNG). 17.5 mm, 0.99 g. ref: Metcalf, Class B MPS 65. Excellent! #CM2006: $299 SOLD
Crusader Kings of Antioch
King Bohemond III. 1162 - 1201 AD. Silver denier. Helmeted head of king in chain-maille armor, crescent and star to sides, + BOAIIVNDVS / Cross patee, crescent in quadrant, + ANTIOCNIA. 19 mm, 1.23 g. #CM2077: $175 SOLD
Crusader Kings of Antioch
King Bohemond III. 1162 - 1201 AD. Billon denier.
Helmeted head of king in chain-maille armor, crescent and star to sides, + BOAMVNDVS / Cross patee, crescent in quadrant, + ANTIOCHIA. 18 mm, 0.98 g. ref: Metcalf 387, CCS 68. Good VF. Excellent detail, nicely centered, "golden" tone, quite attracrive in hand. Possibly from having been buried in hoard with gold for 800 years. ex-Robin Danziger, New York. #CM2543: $299 SOLD
Crusader Kings of Antioch
King Bohemond III. 1162 - 1201 AD. Silver denier. Helmeted head of king in chain-maille armor, crescent and star to sides, + BOAIIVNDVS / Cross patee, crescent in quadrant, + ANTIOCNIA. 17.5 mm, 0.87 g. ref: Metcalf 387 CCS 66e. aVF.
Dark gray tone. ex-M. Breitsprecher. Nice detail! #CM2382: $250 SOLD
Crusader Kings of Antioch
King Bohemond III. 1162 - 1201 AD. Silver denier. Helmeted head of king in chain-maille armor, crescent and star to sides, + BOAIIVNDVS / Cross patee, crescent in quadrant, + ANTIOCNIA. 19 mm, 0.86 g. Excellent dark patina with silver highlights. ref: Metcalf, Crusades 371 CCS 65. #CM2027: $275 SOLD
Crusader Kings of Antioch
King Bohemond III. 1162 - 1201 AD. Silver denier.
Helmeted head of king in chain-maille armor, crescent and star to sides, + BOAIIVNDVS / Cross patee, crescent in quadrant, + ANTIOCNIA. 18mm, 0.86 g. Slightly crinkled flan. ref: Metcalf 387 CCS 66e. aVF. #CM2461: $150 SOLD Crusader Kings of Cyprus. Billon denier struck under Janus, 1398-1432 AD. Lion of Cyprus, "IANVS ROI DE" around / Cross with "IERVSALEM" around. 15 mm, .90 g. #1237: $45 SOLD
Crusaders of Achaea. Frankish Greece.
Philip I of Taranto. 1306 - 1313 AD
Billon-silver denier. obv: + PHS PACH TAR DR cross. rev: DE CLARENCIA Crusader castle tournois, with fleur-de-lis and two pellets. CRU774: $75 SOLD
Crusaders of Achaea. Frankish Greece. William of Villehardouin, 1245-1278 AD. Billon denier tournois. Crusader-style castle tournois, spire surmounted by cross, "CLARENTIA" / Cross patee, "+ C PRINCE ACh." 19 mm with nice tone. #1192: $75 SOLD

Feudal France, time of the Crusades, 12th century AD. Silver denier, Tours mint, anonymous issue. Crusader cross pattée, TVRONVS CIVI / Castle tournois, SCS MARTINVS. 19 mm, 1.14 g. ref: Boudeau 184 Roberts 4856. Dark tone, a few light deposits. Very fine. Much darker than photo allows. ex-Monnaies d'Antan, France. #CM2489: $175 SOLD Crusaders. Frankish Greece, Athens. William II de la Roche, 1280-1287 AD. Billon Denier Tournois. Crusader cross, +ThEBE:CIVIS / Chatel tournois, +G:DVX: ATENES. 19 mm, 0.91 g. ref: Metcalf 1032, MPS 86. Toned aVF. #CM2162: $199 SOLD

Crusader Achaea. Frankish Greece.
Philip I of Taranto. 1306 - 1313 AD
Billon denier. Crusader cross, + PHS PACH TAR DR / Crusader castle tournois, with fleur-de-lis and two pellets, DE CLARENCIA. 18 mm, 0.81 g. Dark silvery tone, light earthen deposits. ex-De Pere, WI collection. #CM2516: $99 SOLD
Crusader France. Philip VI of Valois, 1328-1350 AD. Large silver Gros à la couronne. Cross pattée / Castle tournois, FRANCHORVM. 26mm, 2.06 g. Bright silvery tone, light deposits. ref: Duplessy 262. ex-De Pere, WI collection. #CM2644: $175 SOLD
Crusader Genoa, Italy. 1139-1252 AD. Silver denaro struck under Conrad III. Tower of Jerusalem, city name IANVA / Crusader cross, king's name CVNRADI REX. 15.6 mm, 0.95 g. ref: Biaggi 835 CNI 2/21 MIR 16. EF for type, well struck and lightly toned. Sharp detail! #CM2544: $225 SOLD
Crusaders, Duchy of Athens. Guy II de La Roche, 1287-1308 AD. Billon denier tournois. Type 1b, set into custom silver bezel. Crusader cross pattée, + : GVI DVX : ATENES : / Castle tournois with two arches, + : ThEBANI : CIVIS :. Metcalf, Crusades 1064-6 CCS 93. 25 mm dia (total). Coin ex-Robin Danziger, NY. #CM2396: $299 SOLD

Crusader Kings of Greece, Cyprus & Constantinople

Crusader / Latin kings of Constantinople, 1230-1245 AD. Bronze "tetarteron." Facing bust of king in jeweled diadem / Archangel Michael brandishing sword (stylized). 19 mm. Great olive-green patina. Fantastic coin! #1243: $90 SOLD

Crusader Kings of Constantinople, 1204-1261 AD. Copper trachy. "Scyphate" (cup-shaped) coin. Facing bust of Christ, wearing nimbus, pallium and colobrium / King (on left) with St. Constantine (on right). Nice rugged little coin with great green patina and much eye-appeal! 24 mm diameter. #5034x2: $90 SOLD

Crusader Italy. Ancona, c. 13th century AD. Silver denier, set in custom silver bezel. + DE ANCONA around Crusaders cross / Monogram CVS in circle, + P P S QVI R I A. 18 mm dia. Coin ex-Guildcraft, purchased in 1991. Bright patina. #JN2050: $275 SOLD
Crusader States, County of Tripoli. Raymond II-III. 1137-1187. Silver denier, struck c. late 1140s-1164. Crusader cross pattée, pellet in 1st and 2nd quarters, + RAMVNDVS COMS / Eight-rayed star with pellets above crescent, CIVITAS TRIPOLIS. ref: CCS 6-8 Metcalf 509. 16.3 mm, 0.99 g. ex-CNG. #CM2227: $175 SOLD

Crusaders, Duchy of Athens. Guy II de La Roche, 1287-1308 AD. Billon denier tournois. Type 1b. Crusader cross pattée, + : GVI DVX : ATENES : / Castle tournois with two arches, + : ThEBANI : CIVIS :. Metcalf, Crusades 1064-6 CCS 93. 18.5 mm, 0.84 g. Good VF. ex-Robin Danziger, NY. #CM2399: $150 SOLD
Crusader France & Britain. Richard I the Lionheart. RARE TYPE!
As Duke of Aquitaine, 1172-1189. Silver denier, Bordeaux mint. Cross pattee, +RICARDVS-w (retrograde "S"!) / Crusader cross, +AGVITANIE, small cross above. 18 mm, 0.66 g. ref: Elias 4 Poey d'Avant 2768-var. Dark gray patina, light deposits. Rare! ex-London, UK collection. #CM2503: $275 SOLD
Crusader Genoa, Italy. 1139-1252 AD. Silver denaro struck under Conrad III. Tower of Jerusalem, city name IANVA / Crusader cross, king's name CVNRADI REX. 16 mm, 0.85 g. ref: Biaggi 835 CNI 2/21 MIR 16. EF for type, well struck with old collection toning. Sharp detail! #CM2586: $199 SOLD
Crusader Genoa, Italy. 1139-1252 AD. Silver denaro struck under Conrad III. Tower of Jerusalem, city name IANVA / Crusader cross, king's name CVNRADI REX. 16.5 mm, 0.80 g. ref: Cross V.16. B.835. 16.4 mm, 0.87 g. Nice VF, well struck and lightly toned. ex New Jersey collection. #CM2608: $175 SOLD
Crusaders, Principality of Achaea. Charles II of Anjou, 1285-1289 AD. Silver Denier Tournois. Crusader cross, + K. R. PRINC ACH / Castle tournois, :+: DE: CLARENTIA:. 18mm, 0.81 g. ref: Metcalf 942. ex De Père, WI collection. #CM2655: $150 SOLD
Crusader France. Louis IX (Saint Louis). 1226–1270 AD. Great large silver Gros Tournois, struck 1266-1270 AD. Short cross pattée, LVDOVICVS REX / Chatel tournois, TVRONIS CIVIS. 26mm, 3.86 g. ref: Van Hengel L7 Duplessy 190E Ciani 180. VF, toned. ex-CNG. #CM2609: $375 SOLD
Feudal France. Time of the Crusades. Languedoc, County of Rodez. Hugh II and Hugh III. Silver Denier struck 1156-1180 AD. Cross, + VGO COMES/ + RODES CIVI, D/+/A/S in inner circle. 17mm, 0.85 g. ref: Bd. 767. ex-De Pere, WI collection. Nice cross! #CM2648: $150 SOLD
Crusader France & Britain. Richard I the Lionheart. RARE TYPE!
As Duke of Aquitaine, 1172-1189. Silver denier, Bordeaux mint. Cross pattee, +RICARDVS-w (retrograde "S"!) / Crusader cross, +AGVITANIE, small cross above. 18 mm, 0.67 g. ref: Elias 4 Poey d'Avant 2768-var. This is the rare variety with the omega above RICARDVS and the cross below (as opposed to the other way around). There are a few minor deposits, otherwise very good condition. ex-London, UK collection. #CM2497: $250 SOLD
Crusader Kings of Antioch
King Bohemond III. 1162 - 1201 AD. Billon denier.
Helmeted head of king in chain-maille armor, crescent and star to sides, + BOAMVNDVS / Cross patee, crescent in quadrant, + ANTIOCHIA. 18 mm, 0.89 g. ref: Metcalf 387, CCS 68. Good VF, dark silver tone, nice detail. ex-Howell, MI collection. #CM2545: SOLD
Crusader-Period France. Charles IV, 1322-1328 AD. Silver maille blanche. Set into custom .925 silver bezel. Crusader cross pattee, + KAROLVS REX + BHDICTV: SIT: NOME: DNI: NRI / Châtel tournois, border of twelve lis, + FRANCHORVM. W: 21mm, weighs 2.47 grams (total). ref: Duplessy 243. Nice detail, gunmetal-gray toning with silvery highlights. Charles IV was the last son of Philippe IV le Bel (patron king of the Knights Templar) and last of the Capetian rulers of France. Coin ex-London, UK collection. #CM2467: $299 SOLD



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